Archive | Treatment RSS feed for this section

A New Way to Care for Young Brains (New York Times)

BOSTON — The drumbeat of alarming stories linking concussions among football players and other athletes to brain disease has led to a new and mushrooming American phenomenon: the specialized youth sports concussion clinic, which one day may be as common as a mall at the edge of town. In the last three years, dozens of […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Lasting legacy: Gfeller’s spirit lives on through research into sports-related injuries (Winston-Salem Journal)

Laws have been written, countless charity miles have been run and thousands of dollars have been donated in the name of Matthew Gfeller. The Winston-Salem teen suffered a traumatic brain injury during a tragic football accident in 2008, but thanks to the tireless commitment of his parents, Bob and Lisa Gfeller, his death was not […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Patrick Larimore medically retires (ESPN)

SAN BERNARDINO, Calif. – UCLA middle linebacker Patrick Larimore will take a medical retirement because of multiple concussions, coach Jim Mora said after practice Monday during training camp at Cal State San Bernardino. Larimore, a senior who was a team captain last season, suffered a concussion in April and sat out the latter portion of spring practice. He returned […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

A crushing blow: Two former high school players discuss quitting football due to concussions (ESPN)

Brad Millice remembers it like it was yesterday — but then again, he doesn’t. “I was backpedaling at the linebacker position and a guy came across and ear-holed me while trying to block me,” the 19-year-old said, before taking a pause. “Or so they tell me.” They tell Millice that, after that 2009 contest with […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Sign up for the SPORTSCONCUSSIONS.ORG newsletter!

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Athletic Trainers: Every School Should Have One (Moms Team)

Video from the Third Annual Youth Sports Safety Summit in Washington D.C. in 2011  

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Concussion summit highlights the need for continued concussion education and discussion (PR Wire)

At the 2011 ATSNJ Concussion Summit a panel of medical experts unanimously agreed that everyone along the continuum of sports concussion care needs to be on the same page with respect to injury recognition, evaluation, diagnosis, management, and return to participation. A panel of renowned medical experts in the field of sports related concussions presented […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Unique collaboration with medical centers helps student athletes (Winston-Salem Journal)

The July 12 story in the Journal “Funding remains a challenge for safer helmets,” about the Gfeller-Waller Concussion Act, highlighted the cost of following new safety requirements, but it did not detail the unique partnership Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools has with Wake Forest Baptist Health and Forsyth Medical Center that provides medical care for students that […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Beware of ‘Second-Impact Syndrome’ After Concussions: It can occur when athletes return to play too quickly after head injury (US News)

Young athletes who return to play before a concussion fully heals and sustain another head injury can suffer serious and potentially deadly brain complications, an expert warns. Athletes under age 25 are especially vulnerable to “second-impact syndrome,” according to Dr. James Kinderknecht, a sports medicine and shoulder service physician at the Hospital for Special Surgery […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Testing helps change the game on youth concussions (Tuscon Citizen)

Athletes at the 25 public high schools in Fairfax County, an affluent suburb of Washington, take baseline tests like the ones used by NFL players. The ImPACT tests are one tool doctors and athletic trainers can use to tell when it is safe to return to the field. That’s crucial because a second concussion when […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →